7 KEYS TO ANIMAL HEALTH
You Can Help Your Pets Be Healthier and Live Longer And Help Our Planet, too
 

7 KEYS TO ANIMAL HEALTH

You Can Help Your Pets Be Healthier and Live Longer

And Help Our Planet, too

 

We wish our pets would live long and healthy lives. How healthy is your pet?

 

1. Is he/she acting old, getting stiff, or having trouble jumping on beds?

2. Has there been treatment by a veterinarian for any problem more than once a year?

3. Are there problem behaviors - eating or licking weird things, picky appetite?

4. Does your dog smell "doggy" and need bathing every few months or more?

5. Do they need to be on special diets or supplements or medications?

6. Does your cat vomit hairballs more than once a year?

If you answered yes to more than one of these questions, your pet could become healthier and may be able to live a longer life. Many more of these symptoms are in the list of early warning signs on my website or of the Academy of Veterinary Homeopathy.

How long can your dog or cat live?

Over the 30 years that I have been in practice, I have seen a sharp decline in the life spans of many pets along with the increase in serious disease. A google search showed this comment from 1800petmeds – “The average life expectancy for pets is 10-12 years for dogs and 10-14 years for cats.” When people try different approaches to health, many animals live far longer lives.

 

  • ·Talk to holistic veterinarians and breeders - I know a cat who lived to 34 and many to 28-30 (check out www.Brighthaven.org, the sanctuary who adopted old cats), a golden to 21, a border collie to 22, shepherds to 17, Yorkie to 26, Rotweillers to 16 and many more.
  • ·Read articles in holistic books, magazines and web sites.
  • ·Do a google search on your specific breed and find articles like these.
    • ·http://www.cavaliers.co.uk/articles/adogslifespan.htm
    • ·http://www.netpets.com/dogs/reference/genetics/longevity1c.html

Whatspecific steps can you take to increase the life span and health of your pets? The path to health can be a roundabout journey; just as it can be for humans, or health may be achieved with one simple intervention. Every animal has different needs.

7 Keys to Health

1.Know the Current Level of Health

2.Feed the Best

3.Vaccinate the Least

4.Use the Fewest Chemicals

5.Understand How Animals Become Ill and How They Heal

6.Learn Different Healing Approaches

7.Select the Best Healers for Each Animal’s Health Team

 

1. Current level of health

Do a physical on your pet on a regular basis (more if ill or aged) looking for any of the early warning signs of imbalance, list any medical problems and anything that is of concern to any member of the family. Be sure to quantify each symptom. For example: On a scale of 0 to 10, how itchy is Spot? Juno scratches for 30 minutes after waking, then after every meal for 5 to 10 minutes. Ed licks his belly until the skin is red.

2. Feed the best

Sometimes improvement does not begin until supplements or different foods are started. By tracking the current symptoms and energy level you will know what nutritional approaches are best. Many dogs and cats are healthiest on the freshest, often raw, foods. Do dogs or cats on their own, or wolves, pull out a match to build a fire to cook their meat? Do foxes carry a knife to remove all the bones? Dogs and cats are actually designed to eat raw meaty bones and pureed vegetables. Would you want to eat the same can of “complete” soup every day, even if it is organic? Some dogs, like some people, do fine on less than adequate diets (they are scavengers, too) while others need the best. Cats are not scavengers so need a higher amount of meat protein. There are many different opinions on nutrition, so read articles and think for yourself what makes sense. Then, by tracking your pet’s symptoms you will know which is working the best.

3. Use the fewest vaccines

Give only Distemper and Parvo to puppies (if that) and then give no vaccines except the legally required  Rabies vaccines – usually the first at 4 months, then one a year later, then every 3 years. Cats need only one dose of Panleukopenia (very effective vaccine) then the Rabies. Learn ways to prevent negative reactions - Reiki, Vaccine Detox from Spirit Essences, Calcium. Do not let the need to board, groom or train your dogs force you to vaccinate. There are pet sitters, groomers, pet therapy groups, kennels and more that will take blood "titers".  Contribute to the Rabies Challenge Fund and even Rabies vaccine will be required less frequently (eventually).

4. Use no chemicals: Flea and Tick preventatives, laundry and house products, as well as yard products (even ones used by your neighbors) can weaken the immune system, cause specific illnesses and harm the planet. Research the many alternatives that help our planet too.

5. How dogs get ill and how to evaluate their response to treatment

This is critically important. Sometimes a current problem disappears yet your animal feels less happy or energetic. This is not good. If the itching continues and your animal becomes more energetic and happy, then you know you must be doing something right and can be patient for the skin to clear. The Healthy Animal’s Journal has a great, brief overview of response to treatment and Homeopathic Care of Cats and Dogs is also excellent (especially chapters 1-3).

6. Learn healing techniques yourself

You can learn how to best groom and train your animal. There are wonderful classes in Maryland and Virginia for healing techniques such as flower essences, Reiki, T-Touch (Tellington Touch), HTA (Healing Touch for Animals), essential oils, homeopathy, massage, and more. Every person needs to learn Reiki (or another energy healing) for once “attuned”, your hands are healers and detoxifiers for the rest of your life. Keep adding these tools for healing because the more you can do with your hands, the better for our planet.

7. Select the best healing team

Find a local integrative veterinarian, or at least one who will be open to new information you are learning, be willing to explore new health options with you and are willing to work with the different approaches that you are trying. Many people form a team of people with different skills to help with their animals’ health. They may have a local conventional veterinarian, a specialty veterinary practice, one or more holistic veterinarians and several people giving supportive care (grooming, massage, pet sitter, T-Touch, aroma therapist, etc.).

FINALLY,

Focus on the whole animal

Treat the entire animal, not just current symptoms. Set a goal of glowing, wonderful health and do not settle for less. Do not settle for "just getting old", or "all dogs have that problem." Hint: this is true for your health, too.

Discover what makes your pet thrive

Provide the best environment and life style for your individual animal. Some animals need a lot of attention and exercise, some become ill from too much. Use a journal to track symptoms to know what works best for each pet.

Re-think what you have been told about diet, vaccinations, and environment. Try to build up the overall health and not just give treatments for specific problems. Do not just do what your veterinarian says – ask why for each treatment and diagnostic test. Good veterinarians will take the time to explain and will respect your decisions to do different treatments than she wants.

 

Christina Chambreau, DVM, CVH is an internationally known homeopathic veterinarian, lecturer and author, using homeopathy in her veterinary practice in 1983 (UGA grad in 1980).  She is a co-founder of the Academy Of Veterinary Homeopathy, was on the faculty of the National Center for Homeopathy Summer School for 10 years, is associate editor for the Integrative Veterinary Care Journal, adjunct faculty for the Maryland Veterinary Technician Program.

She teaches classes to lay and professional audiences on Introductory, Intermediate and Advanced Homeopathy for Animals, as well as diet, toxins, healthy animal lifestyles, Flower essences, Reiki, energy healing, homeopathy and living a life that sustains the planet.

Her speaking venues have included many veterinary medical conferences, Groom Expo, American Boarding Kennel Association, health food stores, Great Dane Nationals, other breed clubs and more.

Ask her to come teach/speak on any holistic topic - she loves to teach.

She is author of the Healthy Animal's Journal (and dog, cat and horse), co-author of the Homeopathic Repertory: A Tutorial and How to Have a Stress Free Wedding. 

 

About the Author:
Christina Chambreau - Dr. Christina Chambreau's Guide to Healthy Animals

Christina Chambreau, DVM, CVH is an internationally known homeopathic veterinarian, lecturer and author, using homeopathy in her veterinary practice in 1983 (UGA grad in 1980).  She is a co-founder of the Academy Of Veterinary Homeopathy, was on the faculty of the National Center for Homeopathy Summer School for 10 years, is associate editor for the Integrative Veterinary Care Journal, adjunct faculty for the Maryland Veterinary Technician Program.

She is author of the Healthy Animal's Journal (and dog, cat and horse), co-author of the Homeopathic Repertory: A Tutorial and How to Have a Stress Free Wedding.



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